Latest Keystone Delay Signals Need for Senate Vote

April 28, 2014

Ten days ago, the State Department announced it would delay its review of the Keystone XL pipeline indefinitely, sparking outrage among American workers and supporters of the project. Editorial boards across the country decried the administration for bowing to extreme environmentalists and, once again, putting politics ahead of jobs despite over five and a half years of exhaustive review. This latest failure in leadership by the president further demonstrates the need for Congress to step up and get this jobs and energy project across the finish line. The House has voted to approve the project, and it is now time for the Senate to take action. Last spring, the House passed H.R. 3, the Northern Route Approval Act, authored by Rep. Lee Terry (R-NE), which would clear away all remaining roadblocks and allow construction to begin. As Phil Kerpen noted over the weekend in USA Today, “The bill passed the House 241 to 175 last May, but Reid has refused to allow the Senate to consider it.” Energy and Commerce Committee member Rep. Renee Ellmers echoed the need for Senate action on Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures” with Maria Bartiromo. Ellmers expressed, “I think it's time for Harry Reid to bring a vote up in the Senate on this issue so we know where our senators sit on this issue for the American people."

Rep. Ellmers: Time for a vote on Keystone XL

Rep. Renee Ellmers (R-N.C.) said its time for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to bring approval of the Keystone XL pipeline up for a vote his chamber.

On Sunday, Ellmers blasted the administration for the latest delay in the State Department review of the $5.4 billion pipeline, saying it is time for Congress to act.

"I think it's time for Harry Reid to bring a vote up in the Senate on this issue so we know where our senators sit on this issue for the American people," Ellmers said on Fox News's "Sunday Morning Futures."

Ellmers added that approving Keystone would help the U.S. become energy independent and more secure.

Opponents argue, however, that the pipeline would only add to the nation's greenhouse gas emissions, and expand the carbon-intensive oil sands in Alberta, Canada.

Read the article and watch the Ellmers clip online HERE.

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