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Latta Spotlights EPA’s Costly Ozone Rule


11.04.15

The Environmental Protection Agency last month issued its final regulations revising the current National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ground-level ozone. Despite the fact that ozone levels are down one third since 1980 and continue to trend downward because of already stringent standards on the books, EPA revised the current standard from 75 parts per billion (ppb) to 70 ppb. These regulations threaten jobs production and economic growth across the country. As committee member Rep. Bob Latta (R-OH) writes in the Akron Beacon Journal, “It stands to be the costliest regulation in history, imposing new standards that are overly burdensome, technically unattainable and deficiently demonstrative of providing any environmental or public health benefits.”

The Energy and Commerce Committee has held several hearings and a roundtable discussion examining this rule that some predict could be the EPA’s costliest yet.

November 2, 2015

With ozone rule, a ‘no grow zone’

By: Rep. Bob Latta

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed ozone rule has now been released. It stands to be the costliest regulation in history, imposing new standards that are overly burdensome, technically unattainable and deficiently demonstrative of providing any environmental or public health benefits.

Unfortunately, this Obama administration has chosen to ignore the ramifications of this rule while promoting an increasingly radical environmental agenda. The argument in favor of this — and a growing number of new polices — builds upon a deceptive premise, one that implies the protection of our environment is incompatible with fostering the growth of our energy and manufacturing sectors.

This is a false choice. States and industry have already demonstrated the ability to balance environmental stewardship and promote the economic growth these industries have provided.

Recent data have shown that the adherence to current regulations — both state and federal — and to industry best practices, is already working to reduce ozone while still allowing for economic growth. The EPA’s own data indicate that U.S. ozone precursor emissions have been cut in half since 1980, reducing ozone in the air by 33 percent.

This new ozone rule, proposed last year as part of the administration’s climate agenda, will revise the EPA’s National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) from the current standard of 75 parts per billion to 70 parts per billion.

Counties across the country are investing billions of dollars to meet the 2008 NAAQS standards. Without allowing sufficient time for counties to implement these requirements — the agency only issued guidance to states on implementation this year — the EPA has effectively moved the goalposts in the middle of the game.

Hundreds of counties nationwide fail to meet the new standards, and will now be subjected to costly regulatory restrictions and compliance requirements. 

The final standard levels are so low that some parts of the country could fall into non-attainment even if all human activity in the area were to cease. Indeed, both the Yosemite and the Grand Canyon national parks fall into violation…

To read the full op-ed online, click here.

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