Obama Regulatory Czar Defies Congressional Investigators' Request on Red Tape that Bureaucracies have Identified for Elimination

May 26, 2011

WASHINGTON, DC - Two days after missing a congressional deadline, Obama regulatory czar Cass Sunstein has unveiled the preliminary recommendations that federal agencies were required to submit, identifying onerous regulations.  Sunstein and his staff ignored formal requests from the Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee for the preliminary plans by May 24, only releasing details a few hours in advance of a publicity tour that included a public speech this morning. Sunstein, Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, is scheduled to testify before the Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee on June 3.

"My message to Mr. Sunstein and the Obama administration is that congressional inquiries are not optional," said Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee Chairman Cliff Stearns (R-FL). "It is astonishing that despite this administration's repeated claims of transparency, it continues to ignore and defy basic requests for information.  With today's findings, we redouble our efforts to close the Obama administration's red tape factory and remain vigilant in protecting good paying jobs and fostering a new era of economic growth. We look forward to having an honest and thoughtful conversation with regulatory czar Sunstein next week."  

On January 18, 2011, President Obama signed Executive Order 13563 on Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review. The order states under the General Principles of Regulation: "Our regulatory system must protect public health, welfare, safety, and our environment while promoting economic growth, innovation, competitiveness, and job creation."  The executive order required federal agencies to review existing regulations and submit preliminary plans by May 18.  Sunstein last appeared before the Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee the week after the executive order on regulatory reform was issued in January. 

 

###