Rejected by the President, Canada Ready to Move On

January 18, 2012

Bearing bad news, the president called Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper to inform him that he would not approve the Presidential Permit for construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. Instead of saying "˜yes' to thousands of American jobs and a secure energy source, the president told Harper he needed more time and would reconsider the project under a new application. Disappointed by the president's rejection, Canada is not waiting around for the president to finally make up his mind. The administration has already had over three years to review the project and issue a decision. Harper informed the president that Canada will look to other prospective buyers for its rich oil reserves. House Republicans are acting to ensure the American people will not lose this valuable resource to China. The Energy and Commerce Committee is moving forward with legislation to see to it that the pipeline will be built despite the president's interference.

Bloomberg
Harper Tells Obama Canada to Diversify Energy Exports

Jan. 18 (Bloomberg) - Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper told President Barack Obama in a telephone call today that Canada will seek to diversify its energy exports, after the U.S. rejected a plan to build a pipeline to carry Canadian oil.

Obama called Harper to tell him the U.S. had denied a permit for TransCanada Corp.'s Keystone XL oil pipeline, according to details of the call provided by Harper's office.

Harper "expressed his profound disappointment with the news," according to the statement.

Obama told Harper the rejection was not based on the project's merit and that the company is free to re-apply. Harper told Obama he hoped the project would continue given its importance to growth in both countries.