Upton, Pitts Respond to White House’s Veto Threat of Commonsense Transparency Bill

January 9, 2014

Upton: “Transparency and accountability should rise above partisan politics.”

WASHINGTON, DC – House Energy and Commerce Committee leaders expressed disappointment following today’s White House release of its Statement of Administration Policy opposing H.R. 3811 – the Health Exchange Security and Transparency Act. The legislation, introduced by Health Subcommittee Chairman Joe Pitts (R-PA), would give the Department of Health and Human Services two business days to notify Americans in the event that their personally identifiable information is breached or compromised on the health care law’s exchanges. The House is scheduled to vote on this legislation tomorrow. 

“Transparency and accountability should rise above partisan politics,” said full committee Chairman Fred Upton (R-MI). “This commonsense measure aims to provide some peace of mind to Americans that they will be promptly made aware of any breach that might threaten their personally identifiable information. There is no reason this bill should not receive widespread bipartisan support.”

“In opposing this commonsense bill, the self-proclaimed ‘most transparent administration in history’ has officially sided against greater transparency,” said Health Subcommittee Chairman Joe Pitts (R-PA). “Why not embrace the opportunity to be proactive and prudent, prepared for potential security risks? The White House laments that the bill would ‘create unrealistic and costly paperwork,’ but the paperwork would only be necessary in the event that an individual’s sensitive personal information is jeopardized. If the site is secure, as they claim, no action will be needed. Americans have a right to be notified of such an event, and we are taking steps to make this law.”

The committee’s investigation into the health law’s failed rollout has raised serious questions about the functionality and readiness of the health law. For months administration officials testified that implementation was ‘on track, but documents uncovered reveal that was clearly not the case behind the scenes. Now, the administration’s insistence that everything is secure is rightfully met with skepticism. 

###