Letters

July 9, 2013 | Letter
Excerpt: Both the HHS final rule and the Treasury announcement raise troubling questions about the status of the administration’s efforts to implement the PPACA and to what extent the exchanges will be operational by the time enrollment begins on October 1, 2013. The administration has had three years to implement the PPACA, yet in the span of just three days, two agencies have used administrative actions to significantly change fundamental requirements of the law.
July 9, 2013 | Letter
Excerpt: PPACA places an enormous new burden on employers that clearly contributes to the economy and job growth remaining relatively stagnant. We recognize that the decision to delay the employer mandate was likely not a decision you made in only a day and necessarily required substantial review by analysts at the Department of the Treasury, Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Labor, as well as the Office of Management and Budget.
July 3, 2013 | Letter
Excerpt: This decision was made after "[the administration] heard concerns about the complexity of the requirements and the need for more time to implement them effectively." In the three years since the passage of the PPACA, we have heard similar complaints not only from business owners, but from state leaders, government watchdogs, and individual citizens as well.
June 28, 2013 | Letter
To read the letter, click here. To read DOE's July 22, 2013 response, click here (and Enclosure).
June 28, 2013 | Letter
Excerpt: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) requires that insurers offering plans on the Health Insurance Marketplaces, or exchanges, include a “sufficient number and geographic distribution” of providers that serve predominantly “low-income, medically underserved individuals.” These providers are referred to as Essential Community Providers.
June 27, 2013 | Letter
Excerpt: EPA regularly faces litigation relating to implementation or enforcement of statutes or of its regulations, rulemaking activities, and other actions. Several environmental statutes have provisions that allow citizens – including individuals, states, non-governmental organizations, industry, associations and other entities – to file a lawsuit against EPA challenging certain agency actions or inaction, including lawsuits relating to potential new regulations,”

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