Environment, Manufacturing, & Critical Materials

Subcommittee

Subcommittee on Environment, Manufacturing, & Critical Materials

All matters related to soil, air, noise and water contamination; emergency environmental response, both physical and cybersecurity. In particular, the subcommittee has jurisdiction over The Nuclear Waste Policy Act, The Clean Air Act, The Safe Drinking Water Act, Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act – including Superfund and the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act, The Solid Waste Disposal Act, The Toxic Substance Control Act and The Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Program. Under the Clean Air Act, this subcommittee deals with National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for criteria pollutants; National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Standards; New Source Performance Standards (NSPS); Mobile Source Standards for vehicles, aircraft, fuels and fuel additives, including the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) and greenhouse gas emissions from motor vehicles. The subcommittee focuses on the regulation of solid, hazardous, and nuclear wastes, including mining, nuclear, oil, gas, and coal combustion waste.

Subcommittees News & Announcements


Chair Rodgers Opening Remarks at Hearing on Securing America's Critical Materials Supply Chains

Washington D.C. — House Energy and Commerce Committee Chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA) delivered the following opening remarks at today’s Environment, Manufacturing, and Critical Materials Subcommittee hearing titled “Securing America’s Critical Materials Supply Chains and Economic Leadership.” “Today’s hearing is an opportunity to examine how we reduce our dependence on China and take the steps necessary to maintaining American economic leadership for decades to come. “An important step to achieving this is to significantly increase our domestic production and supply of critical materials, which are foundational to America’s ability to manufacture goods like batteries, electric grid components, semiconductors, and advanced energy technologies, which are crucial to our economic and national security. “If we fail, America will continue to be dangerously reliant upon others for these critical materials, in particular, adversaries, like China, and vulnerable to supply chain disruptions and market manipulation. “It starts with having an honest conversation about what has led us to where we are today and how we have become so dependent on others. “Only then will we be able to advance the solutions necessary to creating the regulatory predictability needed for mining, processing, and refining of these materials domestically, ending our reliance on others, ensuring stable access to critical materials, boosting American manufacturing, and protecting America’s economic future and national security.” HOW WE GOT HERE “Over the last several decades, America’s capacity to mine, process, and refine minerals has been decimated. “The United States was once one of the world’s leading producers of the minerals and metals that are foundational to America’s economic success and national security. “Today, more than 90 percent of those minerals are under the control of the Chinese Communist Party. “Their supply chains stretch from the jungles of the African Congo to smelters and refineries in China. “We have allowed them to establish a monopoly on the core components needed to produce the batteries powering our smartphones, computers, electric cars, and many renewable sources of energy. “To make matters worse, they do this with zero regard for any environmental, labor, or human rights standards. “The Biden administration’s rush to green agenda will only further solidify China’s stranglehold on the market. “By advancing policies that mandate technologies whose core components can only be sourced from China while failing to advance policies to onshore production of those core components, we are only further enriching China—the largest polluter in the world. “The Inflation Reduction Act and Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act were filled with these mandates and pumped hundreds of billions of taxpayer dollars into subsidizing the purchasing of these technologies, exasperating the problem. “We cannot continue doing the same thing over and over again and expect anything to change.” BIDEN’S CRUSHING REGULATIONS “We have to get serious about getting to the root cause of the problem, which is overburdensome regulation and start advancing the policies necessary to onshoring production of critical materials. “The U.S. has enacted the strongest environmental laws in the world, which have helped us clean up our air and water over the last half century. “It’s possible to continue building on our legacy of environmental stewardship without pushing our supply chains overseas. “To do this, however, we need reasonable solutions rather than a continuation of the current regulatory and legal environment that has all but forced U.S. mines and smelters out of business or out of the country. “The good news is that the U.S. has been blessed with tremendous natural resources. We have a rich history of harnessing and leveraging these resources through free market principles. “Today I look forward to discussing what is necessary to continue building on that legacy. “We do it by standing up for American values of free market competition, innovation, environmental stewardship; better aligning our environmental goals with our goals for economic growth and national security, and securing and growing our critical material supply chains to end America’s dependence on adversaries like China.”



UPDATED TIME: Environment, Manufacturing, and Critical Materials Subcommittee Hearing on Critical Materials

Washington D.C. – The House Energy and Commerce Committee Environment, Manufacturing, and Critical Materials Subcommittee hearing  will now start at 11:30 AM ET.         WHAT:  An Environment, Manufacturing, and Critical Materials Subcommittee hearing to discuss ways to secure America’s critical material supply chains and reduce our dependence on foreign adversaries, like China.  DATE: Thursday, June 13, 2024        WHEN: 11:30 AM ET  LOCATION: 2322 Rayburn House Office Building       This notice is at the direction of the Chair. The hearings will be open to the public and press and will be live streamed online at https://energycommerce.house.gov/ . If you have any questions concerning the Subcommittee on Communications and Technology hearings, please contact Noah Jackson at Noah.Jackson@mail.house.gov . If you have any press-related questions, please contact Sean Kelly at Sean.Kelly@mail.house.gov



Chairs Rodgers and Carter Announce Hearing on Securing American Critical Materials Supply Chains

Washington, D.C. — House Energy and Commerce Committee Chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA) and Environment, Manufacturing, and Critical Materials Subcommittee Chair Buddy Carter (R-GA) announced a hearing titled “Securing America’s Critical Materials Supply Chains and Economic Leadership.” “If America is going to continue its manufacturing and energy leadership, we must significantly increase our domestic supply of the necessary critical materials," said Chairs Rodgers and Carter. "These materials are crucial for manufacturing everything from batteries, electric grid components, and semiconductors, to advanced energy technologies. Our current regulatory landscape runs counter to the reasonable predictability necessary for permitting the mining, processing, and refining of these materials domestically. We look forward to hearing from stakeholders and experts on how to grow and secure our critical material supply chains—while maintaining our environmental leadership—and also ensure America isn’t dependent on adversaries like China, which pose a threat to our national and economic security.” Subcommittee on Environment, Manufacturing, and Critical Materials hearing titled “Securing America’s Critical Materials Supply Chains and Economic Leadership” WHAT: Environment, Manufacturing, and Critical Materials Subcommittee hearing on securing our critical materials supply chains and reducing our dependence on foreign adversaries, like China. DATE: Thursday, June 13, 2024 TIME: 10:30 AM ET LOCATION: 2322 Rayburn House Office Building This notice is at the direction of the Chair. The hearing will be open to the public and press and will be livestreamed online at https://energycommerce.house.gov/ . If you have any questions concerning the hearing, please contact Kaitlyn Peterson at Kaitlyn.Peterson@mail.house.gov . If you have any press-related questions, please contact Sean Kelly at Sean.Kelly@mail.house.gov


Subcommittee Members

(22)

Chairman Environment, Manufacturing, and Critical Materials

Buddy Carter

R

Georgia – District 1

Vice Chair Environment, Manufacturing, and Critical Materials

John Joyce

R

Pennsylvania – District 13

Ranking Member Environment, Manufacturing, and Critical Materials

Paul Tonko

D

New York – District 20

Gary Palmer

R

Alabama – District 6

Greg Pence

R

Indiana – District 6

Dan Crenshaw

R

Texas – District 2

Randy Weber

R

Texas – District 14

Rick Allen

R

Georgia – District 12

Troy Balderson

R

Ohio – District 12

Russ Fulcher

R

Idaho – District 1

August Pfluger

R

Texas – District 11

Mariannette Miller-Meeks

R

Iowa – District 1

John James

R

Michigan – District 10

Cathy McMorris Rodgers

R

Washington – District 5

Diana DeGette

D

Colorado – District 1

Jan Schakowsky

D

Illinois – District 9

John Sarbanes

D

Maryland – District 3

Yvette Clarke

D

New York – District 9

Raul Ruiz

D

California – District 25

Scott Peters

D

California – District 50

Nanette Diaz Barragán

D

California – District 44

Frank Pallone

D

New Jersey – District 6

Recent Letters


May 16, 2024
Press Release

Bicameral Republican Committee Leaders Press Secretary Blinken for Clarity on Climate Policy Leadership Structure

Washington, D.C. — In a new letter, House Energy and Commerce Committee Chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA), House Foreign Affairs Committee Chair Michael McCaul (R-TX), Senate Foreign Relations Committee Ranking Member Jim Risch (R-ID), and Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Ranking Member Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) are pressing Secretary of State Antony Blinken to clarify the leadership structure of the Biden administration as it sets climate policy on the international stage.  BACKGROUND :  In January 2024, the White House announced that Secretary John Kerry would be leaving the Special Presidential Envoy for Climate (SPEC) role and that John Podesta would “continue to lead […] global climate efforts” by assuming the role of Senior Advisor to the President for International Climate Policy  Rather than nominate Mr. Podesta to the SPEC role, which would require confirmation with the advice and consent of the Senate under legislation signed into law in 2021, President Biden appointed Mr. Podesta to a new position based in the White House that appears to have striking similarities to the SPEC role previously held by Secretary Kerry.  As the Republican leaders of the House Energy and Commerce Committee and the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee described in a March 5, 2024, letter to President Biden, the administration appears to be deliberately evading congressional oversight of its international climate policy by appointing Mr. Podesta to an advisory position in the White House.  The response from the White House Counsel’s office to the Committees stated, “On January 31, 2024, the White House announced President Biden’s appointment of Mr. Podesta to serve as Senior Advisor to the President for International Climate Policy. Mr. Podesta now leads interagency coordination of the Administration’s international climate policy agenda.”  It also stated, “Mr. Podesta’s role is not a replacement for SPEC, and the State Department will continue to lead international climate diplomacy, including negotiations, for the United States.”  Despite the White House’s assertion that Mr. Podesta would coordinate “interagency” efforts, he has met with foreign leaders on at least two occasions since assuming his new position.  KEY EXCERPT :  “Mr. Podesta’s coordination with the SPEC office and international representation of the United States in meetings with foreign leaders to discuss international climate policy appear to far exceed the characterization of Mr. Podesta’s role in the initial response to the Committees as merely leading ‘interagency coordination’ for the administration’s international climate policy.  “In light of this apparent overlap of duties between what Secretary Kerry undertook as the SPEC and what Mr. Podesta is now undertaking as a ‘Senior Advisor,’ we request information on the roles and responsibilities of the SPEC and the Senior Advisor to the President for International Climate Policy, as well as information on ongoing or planned coordination between these two entities.”  CLICK HERE to read the full letter. 



May 14, 2024
Letter

E&C Republican Leaders Press Biden EPA for Answers About Grants Awarded to Political Allies

Washington, D.C. — In a new letter to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Michael Reagan, House Energy and Commerce Committee Chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA), Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Chair Morgan Griffith (R-VA), and Subcommittee on Environment, Manufacturing, and Critical Materials Chair Buddy Carter (R-GA), on behalf of the Oversight and Environment Subcommittee Republicans, are pressing for answers about the recently-awarded Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund (GGRF) grants.  KEY LETTER EXCERPTS :  “As you know, the Committee has questioned how the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) planned to distribute the $20 billion available to selected recipients under the new GGRF program, including the $14 billion for the National Clean Investment Fund (NCIF). Specifically, the Committee cited warnings that the EPA could use these large awards to subsidize favored organizations. At a January 30, 2024, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations hearing, Committee Chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers highlighted examples of former Biden administration officials and Democratic campaign staff in leadership roles of organizations vying for NCIF funding. Predictably, the EPA’s April 4, 2024, announcement of NCIF recipients confirmed our fears that this program would funnel taxpayer dollars to political allies.” [...] “Other individuals with ties to Democratic politics also lead organizations partnering with these recipients. While the EPA insists it had ethics rules and a fair competition policy in place, doling out billions of dollars to organizations led by politically connected individuals undermines public trust in the legitimacy of the federal financial awards process. It also furthers the concern that this program was created as an excuse to hand out funding to political allies.” The Chairs cited more than a dozen examples of politically connected leaders of organizations to which EPA plans to distribute billions of taxpayer dollars, and have requested a list of all of the nearly two dozen stakeholder meetings the EPA held in designing the program, including the dates, names of the individuals and organizations participating as well as any related minutes or memoranda by May 28, 2024. CLICK HERE to read the full letter. 



Chairs Rodgers and Carter Demand EPA Reject California’s CARB Authorization Request

Washington, D.C. — House Committee on Energy and Commerce Chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA) and Environment, Manufacturing, and Critical Materials Subcommittee Chair Buddy Carter (R-GA) sent a letter to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Michael Regan outlining concerns about how new California Air Resources Board (CARB) regulations could harm the rail sector.  Highlights from POLITICO’s Morning Transportation Newsletter, which covered the letter exclusively:   FIRST IN MT, NO TO CARB: Energy and Commerce Chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-Wash.) and Environment, Manufacturing, and Critical Materials Subcommittee Chair Buddy Carter (R-Ga.) are urging EPA Administrator Michael Regan to reject a California proposal to make particular trains running in the state follow more stringent emissions standards.   The lawmakers say the rule — approved last year by the California Air Resources Board and that would by 2030 restrict certain trains from operating in the state unless they are less than 23 years old or are zero emissions vehicles — would “lead to higher consumer prices, impair the country’s transportation system, and harm interstate commerce.”   KEY LETTER EXCERPTS   We write regarding the “In-use Locomotive Regulation” (hereinafter “the CARB regulation”) issued by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), which would force the premature retirement of reliable and affordable diesel locomotives and has the potential to upend our nation’s rail system and supply chains. CARB has made a request to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for a Federal authorization of the CARB regulation, which would impose zero-emissions requirements on locomotives. Given the interconnectedness and importance of rail service to our nation’s transportation and commerce systems, Congress has consistently found that railroads are to be regulated at the federal level. California’s requested authorization, if granted, would violate statutory authority, negatively impact States without the public policy goals of California, lead to higher consumer prices, impair the country’s transportation system, and harm interstate commerce.   [...]   Rail transportation makes up just 1.7 percent of transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions in the United States.19 Rather than seeking top-down, command and control policies, which will raise costs, hasten consolidation in the rail sector, and do little to reduce the overall emissions footprint of the globe, we urge you to reject California’s authorization request.   CLICK HERE to read the full letter to Administrator Regan.